I have spent a large part of my adult life responding to mass fatality events; such as the Oklahoma City Bombing, the 9/11 Terrorist attacks, the 2003 Bali Bombings, the Bombing of UN Headquarters in Baghdad, Hurricane Katrina, the South Asian Tsunami, the Haitian Earthquake, and the Grenfell Tower Fire, to name a few.

In 1998, after 10 years in the US Army I joined Kenyon, a public company. I became the CEO in 2003 and took the company private in 2007. In August 2021, my husband and I sold Kenyon.

I am ordinary man who so far has lived an extraordinary life, in what feels like multiple professional and personal lifetimes I have seen and been through many of the world worst crises. I have spent most of my life’s work in leadership and the key areas of communication, humanitarian assistance, forensics, and recovery as part of crisis management.

My role now is that of an advocate to make things better and to be a teacher to share lessons learned.  There are still things we need and can do better in the areas of leadership and crisis management. We need to further improve humanitarian response to mass fatality events worldwide. We need to train a new generation of responders.  We need better integration of the many different agencies, groups and people involved in responding to these events. Standards in the private sector are badly needed to ensure a professional level of care and response among a wide field of companies now involved, a certification if you will.

We need leadership in business to understand that profit and taking care of people are not exclusive.  To change the mindset and focus of some Chief Executive Officers, their advisors in the legal / insurance industry and show them that there are better ways to go through change, to manage crisis and care for people.

We also need to change the structure of current US disaster response policy. We can and should enhance current response assets and capabilities across the federal level, to better aid in the mitigation of the aftermath, and alleviate the consequences of disasters to quicken the long-term recovery.

I have spent my life working with people in crisis, made mistakes and learned many lessons, I want to help the next generation continue with the advocacy of caring.

Pre-signing books at Key West landmark Books & Books, for Tuesday's release

I have spent a large part of my adult life responding to mass fatality events; such as the Oklahoma City Bombing, the 9/11 Terrorist attacks, the 2003 Bali Bombings, the Bombing of UN Headquarters in Baghdad, Hurricane Katrina, the South Asian Tsunami, the Haitian Earthquake, and the Grenfell Tower Fire, to name a few.

In 1998, after 10 years in the US Army I joined Kenyon, a public company. I became the CEO in 2003 and took the company private in 2007. In August 2021, my husband and I sold Kenyon.

I am ordinary man who so far has lived an extraordinary life, in what feels like multiple professional and personal lifetimes I have seen and been through many of the world worst crises. I have spent most of my life’s work in leadership and the key areas of communication, humanitarian assistance, forensics, and recovery as part of crisis management.

My role now is that of an advocate to make things better and to be a teacher to share lessons learned.  There are still things we need and can do better in the areas of leadership and crisis management. We need to further improve humanitarian response to mass fatality events worldwide. We need to train a new generation of responders.  We need better integration of the many different agencies, groups and people involved in responding to these events. Standards in the private sector are badly needed to ensure a professional level of care and response among a wide field of companies now involved, a certification if you will.

We need leadership in business to understand that profit and taking care of people are not exclusive.  To change the mindset and focus of some Chief Executive Officers, their advisors in the legal / insurance industry and show them that there are better ways to go through change, to manage crisis and care for people.

We also need to change the structure of current US disaster response policy. We can and should enhance current response assets and capabilities across the federal level, to better aid in the mitigation of the aftermath, and alleviate the consequences of disasters to quicken the long-term recovery.

I have spent my life working with people in crisis, made mistakes and learned many lessons, I want to help the next generation continue with the advocacy of caring.